Review

I must admit I’ve never been the biggest fan of ‘X-Men.’ I first heard about them when they had the Saturday morning cartoon show in the ’90s, which I didn’t care for. I then learned about the comic books, and went a little deeper into the stories of the ‘X-Men,’ which took forever. There’s so many characters and heroes, that it takes three years of comic books before something ever actually happens. (At least that’s what every fan always told me) This is also, I imagine why there’s been so many movies of the series in recent years. I saw the first ‘X-Men,’ movie years ago, and thought it was, okay.

The second film, I liked, but, it wasn’t anything I would particularly brag about. I haven’t seen ‘X-Men 3,’ of ‘X-Men Origins: Wolverine‘ yet. Which is also something that’s always bugged me (Well, that and, why isn’t Storm, who controls the weather, more important, than the one with claws that can just heal himself), if there’s all these genetic mutations, why are they all different? Wouldn’t there be a lot of people who can walk through walls or control fire, or teenage girls that kills anybody who tries to have with them? (That last thought is scary though) Well, I don’t exactly get any of these questions answered in ‘X-Men: First Class,’ but I think the film actually got a little closer to answering them than ever before.

x-men: first class

Image via 20th Century Fox

The film begins in the past where a young Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) finds Raven (Jennifer Lawrence) sneaking into his house for food, disguised as his mother. Charles Xavier is a telepath, while Raven is blue, but can change her appearance to look like anybody she wants. Charles Xavier grows up to become the top genetic mutation expert in the country, and eventually gets recruited by the CIA after a strange incident involving a former Nazi, Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon, at one of the better evil parts.) Shaw has a history with Erik (Michael Fassbender), who knows about his power, which is a telekenetic ability to move metal. Eventually the G-Men, as the CIA begins calling them, starts recruiting and rounding up, for an impending battle with Shaw, as well as possibly for the Cold War. The movie ends with a very different interpretation of the Cuban Missile Crisis, than what most people reported happening, and there’s some really strong performances by Bacon, Lawrence, January Jones is really good as Shaw’s diamond-like telepath Emma Frost, and by Fassbender and Nicholas Hoult, who playes a Jekyll-like lab technician who becomes Beast.

(SIDENOTE: Jennifer Lawrence, is given an unusual high amount of recognizable screen time on ‘X-Men: First Class’, compared to Rebecca Romijn in the other films.)

The movie actually does quite a good job at kind of establishing the early beginning mythology of ‘X-Men,’ which like I said, was always filled with holes for me, and still has holes for me. But at least it’s a little bit more clear in this film, ‘X-Men: First Class’ gives a decent explanation of the constant future battles the X-Men have with both humans, and each other. If anything, it’s so clear that I actually have to ask: Why didn’t they just start with ‘X-Men: First Class’ to begin with? I think I might appreciated the following entries just a little more if they did.

I’m David Baruffi, and as always, I get the last word.

x-men: first class

Image via 20th Century Fox



About the Author

David Baruffi
David Baruffi
David Baruffi has been a successful unemployed screenwriter for, let's be vague and call it "years". He's got a B.A. in Film Studies from UNLV, is a certified script supervisor and has done a little bit of everything in film, but mostly is a writer. Personally on his own blog "David Baruffi's Entertainment Views and Reviews" which is at www.davidbaruffi.blogspot.com,and professionally has written several scripts and stories, for himself, and for others and as a ghostwriter. When he's not doing that he watches his autistic brother most days and he looks like two old puppets.